The Weekly Shop (4th – 8th August)

Welcome to another week’s edition of The Weekly Shop news digest. This week, we have been reading about concept stores, how and why your paid search agency should fail and how online browsing could save the high street.

Concept stores: what do they mean for customer experience?

Our first article this week looks at how we have seen the resurgence of the concept store over the last three years as retail has woken up to the value of service, great product display, interactivity, digital technology and a great shopping experience.  Econsultancy have taken a look at some of the concept stores out there from the likes of Argos, Apple and Burberry and what they mean for customer experience.

Online browsing ‘could save the high street’

While on the subject of the high street, a new study from SalesGossip has found that many of their users visited stores after browsing and researching online. The study found that their respondents will find information about products online but then go into the store to make the final purchase highlighting that online and in-store together are much greater than the sum of their individual parts.

Multichannel retailers enjoy faster m-commerce growth than pureplays: study

New research has found that multichannel retailers are enjoying stronger growth from m-commerce than their online-only competitors. Those using channels including shops and a website to sell saw sales via mobile rise by 79% in the period from January to June, according to a study by Capgemini and IMRG, while those who only sell via a website saw their m-commerce sales lift by 59%. More over on Internet Retailing.

5 Myths About Mobile Content Strategies and What You Can Do Instead

Matt Cutts recently stated that he expects Google’s mobile traffic to exceed desktop traffic in the very near future. If you don’t have a plan for mobile, you certainly need to make it a high priority. If you’re starting to think about your mobile strategy then this article from Clickz outlines five common myths about what it means to optimize content for mobile so you can be sure not to include them in your planning.

How and Why Your PPC Agency Should Fail

Here’s an interesting article from Clickz on why failure shouldn’t be a bad word in the PPC industry. It should be used as a tool for growth and continual improvement. The article features some useful tips on how you and your agency should be coming together to make progress on your accounts.

Thanks for reading!

The Weekly Shop (28th Jul – 1st Aug)

In the Weekly Shop this week, we take a look at how British town centres have adapted as consumers move towards digital, some Facebook news, which includes a useful new ‘Save’ feature and how to breath life into old content.

Town centres adapt as consumers move towards digital and convenience: report

A new report has shown that British town centres are changing as they adapt to evolving customer demands. The report found that Britons are above all looking for convenience – and finding it both in high street, for quick ‘top-up’ shops, and online shopping, whereas once they found it in out-of-town retail destinations. The report suggests convenience is driving digital ways of buying and that click and collect has pushed people back to stores. More on the report over on Internet Retailing.

With Save, Facebook Lets You Bookmark Posts For Later

After announcing their ‘Buy Now’ button trial last week, Facebook have also just announced that they are testing a new ‘Save’ feature. This feature will let you bookmark things you discover on Facebook, so you can read them at a more convenient time. This will no doubt be very useful for both brands and users as posts frequently get lost in the constantly refreshing news feed.

399 Million People Use Facebook Only From Mobile

Keeping on the topic of Facebook, this week we also learnt that Facebook has now 399 million mobile-only monthy active uses. This means that almost 1 out of 3 Facebook users never use the web version of Facebook, clearly showing a trend of users moving away from Facebook’s web platform. Definitely something to keep in mind when you are planning your marketing efforts on Facebook.

How to breathe new life into old content

One of the biggest changes within content marketing is constantly coming up with ideas for great content. Whilst fresh content is important, you should equally be thinking about repurposing the fantastic content you’ve already created. This article from Econsultancy explores how you can breathe new life into old content, so it performs a useful function within your user journey.

Google Introduces Product Ratings on PLAs

Onto a new development in Paid Search. This week, Google announced that starting in late July, Product Listing Ads (PLA) will now feature product ratings. Currently this feature is only available in the U.S. but Google have stated that it will be introducing product ratings in additional countries throughout 2014. Definitely something to keep an eye on if you use reviews on your website.

Finally, Google Analytics App Arrives on iPhone

Another development from Google this week saw a version of Google Analytics released for iPhone. The iPhone app comes more than two years after Google released Google Analytics for Android and allows users to check in on their website analytics — including real-time visitor reports — from the comfort of their smartphone. In addition to real-time and time-based reports, the app can be used to view behaviors, conversions and more.

See you next week!

The Weekly Shop (7th – 11th July)

Welcome to a new edition of the Weekly Shop – our digital marketing and retail news roundup. This week we have been reading about creating customer experiences that people remember, lessons from John Lewis’ successful mobile strategy and link building habits to break now.

Create customer experiences that people remember

To kick us off this week – an interesting read from Econsultancy about how digital experiences need to become more like human to human relationships in order to create the types of experiences that people remember and want to share.

Nearly half of UK consumers use mobile as their main decision making tool when buying

The second annual UK Mobile Path-to-Purchase Study conducted by Nielsen has found that as many as 46% of UK consumers now use mobile devices as their primary tool for purchase decision making. In addition, one in four use mobile devices as their exclusive shopping research tool. These findings confirm that mobile is a becoming an increasingly powerful part of today’s consumer purchase process.

Five lessons from John Lewis’ mobile commerce strategy

While we’re on the subject of mobile, at the start of the year, John Lewis announced some impressive year on year sales figures, along with the revelation that more than three quarters of its site traffic on Christmas Day came from mobile devices. This article from Econsultancy takes a look at what John Lewis’ is getting right with its mobile strategy and what lessons can be learnt.

John Lewis Mobile Website

Image source: https://econsultancy.com/blog/65153-five-lessons-from-john-lewis-mobile-commerce-strategy

5 Bad Link Building Habits To Break Now

These days, link building is no longer just about the link. It’s about soliciting a solid mention from a relevant and quality site that drives traffic and sales. This means taking the time to find the right sites, taking the time to find the right people, and letting go of those bad link building habits. This article from Search Engine Land provides five of those habits that you really need be letting go of.

The Leapfrogg Paid Search Onboarding Process

And to finish off this week – a post from our paid search manager for the Frogblogg about how we onboard new paid search clients.

Thanks for reading!

 

The Weekly Shop (23rd – 27th June)

Hello, and welcome to this week’s Weekly Shop. This week we take a look at new consumer laws, modern age SEO myths, content marketing tips for small businesses and creating a single view of stock.

New consumer laws and their impact on retailers

In retail news this this week, two sets of consumer laws have been announced that are set to have a major impact on UK retailers. The two pieces of legislation make substantial changes to consumers’ contractual rights and as a result of these changes, retailers must ensure that they comply with these new consumer laws by updating both their standard consumer agreements and consumer facing procedures accordingly.

Doddle rolls into stations across the UK

Also this week, Doodle, the UK’s first fully dedicated and staffed online shopping collection and returns service has announced it will open in 300 new locations in the next three years. Doodle operates in railway stations and major hubs, and is partnering with a number of well-known retailers including Asos and New Look. We’re looking forward to trailing the service when it launches in Brighton.

Creating a single view of stock: five key considerations

Adopting a single view of your stock across retail channels is an essential precursor to a true multichannel strategy. This next article from Econsultancy provides five key factors for retailers need to consider when looking to create a single view of their stock.

Uh-Oh…Looks Like We Might Have Lost the Customer

Here’s a good, quick read on the importance of creating a customer centric business from Clickz. The article highlights the three key questions you need to be asking yourself when migrating to a customer-centric organisation, versus a product-centric organisation.

Pinterest Moves a Step Closer to Search Engine With Guided Search

Pinterest has recently announced that it will be rolling out guided search on Pinterest over the next few weeks, as it did for its mobile app in April. Pinterest users will soon see a new search bar when they visit Pinterest.com, and just as it works on mobile, the search features will surface recommended keywords intended to help generate more specific queries and better search results. These adjustments to Pinterest functionality over time demonstrate the site’s vision for the future.

7 Outstanding Content Marketing Tips for Small Businesses

As SEO has evolved in recent years, it has become clear that small businesses need to adopt the content marketing strategies that corporate marketers use to remain competitive in rankings. If you’re struggling for creative ideas for interesting new content, then this article from Search Engine Watch provides seven tips for providing outstanding content.

7 Modern Age SEO Myths

One of the challenges that the world of SEO presents us with is its lack of clarity as search engines obscure and continuously tune their algorithms. This insightful article from Forbes aims to draw a bigger picture of how you need to process the claims that people make about SEO and debunks some of the newer myths about SEO that have emerged only in the past few years.

Thanks for reading!

The Weekly Shop (2nd – 6th June)

In The Weekly Shop this week…20 things retailers should know about their customers, the increasing importance of m-commerce to online retailers, how eBay lost 80% of its organic traffic and how to effectively link build in 2014.

20 things a retailer really should know about their customers

Last week, we featured an article from our commercial director, Ben, emphasising the importance of customer data and insight to shaping a retail marketing strategy. To support this article, we’ve reviewed the results of a survey that we ran at the recent SheerB2B ecommerce conference which has revealed some interesting findings. Head over to Ben’s post on the Econsultancy blog to find out more.

More than a third of online retail now via smartphones and tablets

The latest results from the MRG Capgemini Quarterly Benchmarking report has shown that more than a third of all online sales are now made on a mobile device as m-commerce continues to increase its share of the UK e-retail market. These results once again highlight the increasing importance of m-commerce to online retailers in the UK.

eBay Just Lost 80% of its Organic Rankings: Here’s Why

A few weeks ago Google rolled out Panda 4.0 – an update which is designed to prevent sites with poor quality content from working their way into Google’s top search results. Ebay is one company who has suffered a massive loss in organic traffic and rankings due to this update, and this article from Social Media Today explores the reasons why.

Backlinks = Rankings, Rankings = Traffic – Deal With It

Our last article this week comes from Search Engine Watch who have explored how link building still is one of the best ways to boost organic rankings, which was recently confirmed by Googe’s Matt Cutts. However, there’s a big difference between link building and link spamming and the kind of links that matter are the ones that are editorially given and this article explores some of the most effective techniques for building links in 2014.

Thanks for reading and see you next week!

A round-up of Brighton SEO

At the end of last month I attended the best Brighton SEO yet. From the opening keynote to the afternoon’s content-focused talks in the Corn Exchange, the day was packed with actionable takeaways. However, the five talks that really stood out for me were:

  • How I Earned Loads of Links by Ignoring SEO – Malcolm Coles
  • The Habits That Land You Links – Stacey Cavanagh
  • How journalistic principles will shape the digital marketing of tomorrow – Julia Ogden
  • Using Content for Direct Response – Matt Evans
  • The Content Marketing Blueprint for Boring Industries – Mike Essex

Below, you’ll find my summaries (largely taken from my frantically scrawled notes) of the key points from each talk plus links to slide decks where available.

How I Earned Loads of Links by Ignoring SEO – Malcolm Coles

The conference kicked off with a keynote from Malcolm Coles, General Manager at The Daily Mirror and founder of UsVsTh3m. Malcolm spoke about how UsVsTh3m’s goal has always been to gain the biggest share of their traffic through social rather than search. They’ve achieved this through creating topical, highly shareable content in the form of games and quizzes, such as:

  • The ‘Where’s Damascus?’ Game – thousands of people played the game online and failed miserably, including people from the Houses of Parliament, which resulted in news coverage.
  • How Much Are You Hated By The Daily Mail? – though impossible to get to the end of unless you’re Michael Gove, this short piece of interactive content attracted over a million players, multiple pieces of online coverage with hugely authoritative links and caused UsVsTh3m to rank 3rd for the search term ‘Daily Mail’ for months.

Malcolm also spoke about how The Daily Mirror now sees more mobile traffic than desktop. Therefore, you must ensure that any content you outreach to publications (e.g. infographics) needs to look good on mobile. Your outreach email will probably be read in mobile too. What’s more, infographics sent as huge JPEGs won’t look good on mobile – these should be created in HTML and should be responsive. When UsVsTh3m launched their ‘Northometer’ quiz, 85% of plays came from mobile. In fact, the entire UsVsTh3m site is designed for mobile – Malcolm even went as far as to say that they “don’t really care” how it looks on desktop.

The most important takeaway of Malcolm’s talk was about content headlines. The best-performing headlines are interesting (you want to read them) and mysterious (they don’t give too much away) – these are the headlines that get you clicks AND shares.

Essentially, online content can be divided down into four categories: 

  • Gets clicked AND shared (what goes viral)
  • Gets clicked NOT shared (tends to be content that includes swearing – after all, “your Mum is on Facebook”)
  • Gets shared NOT clicked (rubbish headlines, but good content)
  • Doesn’t get shared OR clicked (most online content) 

You want your content to fall into the top category and sites like Buzzfeed work extremely hard to get this right – it’s standard for them to A/B test up to 25 different headlines for each piece of content.

Three more key points from Malcolm’s talk were:

  • If you’re creating content that’s getting shared, the most important thing is that it’s visual – this means people writing about it are forced to link to it because it’s not something that they can describe with the same level of impact
  • The reason quizzes work so well when it comes to generating content that gets shared is because people want to share content that’s self-affirming – i.e. it reinforces the way that people perceive themselves and/or want to be perceived by others
  • Use Facebook Ads to deliver niche content to the right people – when people in a niche start talking about something, it’s likely to get picked up by relevant publications

The Habits That Land You Links – Stacey Cavanagh

Next up was Stacey Cavanagh, Head of Search at Tecmark, talking about getting into the habits that land you links. Stacey spoke about the importance of allowing time to be creative, championing the 6-3-5 method which enables six people to generate 108 ideas in 30 minutes. Next, you should use NUF testing (New, Useful, Feasible) to work out which ideas are worth following up – score each idea out of ten for each of these things and prioritise the highest scoring ideas.

Additional takeaways from Stacey’s talk were:

  • Use a tool such as fivesecondtest.com to A/B test the effectiveness of your tweets
  • Don’t underestimate the importance of having a Flickr page with high quality, original images – ensure all images have a Creative Commons attribution license and include direction as to how to attribute
  • Have regular image reclamation sessions – imageraider.com helps to find sites using your images, then you can request attribution and a link
  • Create stories from surveys – this is a great tactic for getting news links, even if you just write a story about it (you don’t need a fancy infographic to get quality links)
  • Don’t underestimate the effectiveness of offline content – e.g. doing something “real” that results in coverage; links are a by-product of coverage
  • Old-fashioned communications are disruptive – when it comes to outreaching to your contacts, doing something like sending a hand-written letter will get you more attention than an email

How journalistic principles will shape the digital marketing of tomorrow Julia Ogden 

Julia was a journalist before she went on to work at Zazzle. Her talk was about how she’s used the skills she learnt while working in local media to inform her digital marketing tactics. Key points were:

  • Most people don’t read more than 250 words of a piece of content so make sure all the important information is at the top – the introduction to any piece of content needs to hook the reader and make them want to read on
  • The internet is crying out for high quality, well-written content – in essence, this is all that “SEO content” is
  • Content marketers should take advantage of the citizen journalism approach and crowd-source content from brand advocates and social influencers
  • Google rewards a website/business which has a range of followed links, no follow links and even just online mentions – Google recently released a patent to reward content that just mentions a brand or associated keywords, but has no links
  • When you’re creating content, always think about what’s new or different – why should people care about what you have to say?

 Using Content for Direct Response Matt Evans

It was Matt’s first time speaking at Brighton SEO and I thought his talk was one of the most useful from the day. Matt spoke at length about selling through content and provided some really great takeaways.

In essence, we’ve stopped stuffing Google with keywords and started stuffing it with content – but what so many online marketers overlook is that the sales funnel is content.

Matt outlined that there are four stages of the sales funnel that your consumers go through:

  • Unaware – content at this stage should catch peoples’ attention
  • Know the situation – content at this stage should inform people of the situation
  • Product awareness – content at this stage should inform people about the product
  • Purchase intent – content at this stage should push people to sale

Too often, content created “for SEO” overlooks this and completely misses the sales process:

  • Your content should inform your audience – because an informed audience is more likely to purchase
  • Get your content in the right place at the right time – tailor your content to what your audience want / need to see at each stage of the buying journey 
  • Re-market to your content, not just your products – use your content to move your potential customers down the funnel until they’re ready to purchase
  • Don’t underestimate the importance of post-purchase campaigns – it costs 5 x more to acquire a new customer than to sell again to an existing customer
  • Stop thinking about links first – create content with a real purpose

The Content Marketing Blueprint for Boring Industries – Mike Essex

Mike Essex from Koozai spoke about how we’re so obsessed with “great content” that we often totally overlook that fact that “boring content” is actually the best opportunity in content marketing. Great content might achieve awareness, but boring content is what sells.

Opportunities to create boring content include:

  • Your ‘About’ section
  • Technical specifications
  • Press releases (these are still important and great for targeting niche audiences, which can be critically important)
  • Company location pages

Ways that you can achieve stand-out “boring content” are:

  • Repackage boring content in a visually interesting way  – e.g. highly visual technical specification pages
  • Distil your product information down into simple-to-follow comparisons – sometimes you have to focus on what stops people buying and create content to address this
  • Think about customer aftercare – for example, other sites were ranking for Vax user guides so Vax invested in creating their own
  • Have great product pages – Aviva are a great example of a company which uses its product pages to give them a competitive edge

Above all, remember that on-site content such as this MUST convert – that should always be your end goal!

 

 

 

The Weekly Shop (7th – 11th April)

Welcome to a new edition of The Weekly Shop. This week, we take a look at customer lifetime value, the importance of post-purchase interactions, an example of brands using Google’s Shoppable Hangouts, and the rumours that Google could be about to block paid search keyword data.

Just 42% of companies are able to measure customer lifetime value

Econsultancy’s new Building Loyalty and Driving Revenue in the Digital Age report looks at how customer lifetime value (CLV) is a crucial concept for companies looking to improve retention rate, but one which companies find hard to measure. Econsultancy surveyed almost 900 agency and company respondents, and found that, though the vast majority agreed that CLV was an important concept, just 42% said they were able to measure it. Head over to Econsultancy for more on the findings.

The sale doesn’t end at checkout: survey shows the importance of post-purchase interactions

A new survey has shown that 86% of consumers said it was important to them that they have a positive experience after making a purchase, highlighting the importance of post-purchase interactions. This article highlights some of the findings from the study and how you can make improvements to your post-purchase communications to encourage repeat customers.

Asos and Nike team up for first shoppable Google Hangout

Last week, we featured a new concept from Google, Shoppable Hangouts, and recently ASOS and Nike have teamed up for the first shoppable video web chat to celebrate 27 years of Nike’s Air max trainer. On the day of the hangout, users could shop while they watched, and make purchases directly from the promotion.

Mobile is now the main driver of global ad spend growth: stats

Forecasts suggest that mobile advertising will continue to grow by an average of 50% a year between 2013 and 2016, thanks to the widening penetration of smartphones and tablets. These figures come from ZenithOptimedia’s latest advertising expenditure forecast, which reveal that overall global advertising spend will rise from 3.9% in 2013 to 5.5% in 2014, with further growth expected to increase to 6.1% in 2016. More over on Econsultancy.

10 Surprising Facts About “Keyword (Not Provided)” For Paid Search

The big news in digital marketing this week was the rumour that Google could be about to block paid search keyword data. Last year, Google did this with organic search data which was a major setback to publishers, who began to losing data about the keywords used to reach their sites. This article from Search Engine Land aims to clarify fact from fiction and provides 10 things you need to know about the Keyword (Not-Provided) for paid search issue.

‘No-Links Ranking’ – The Battle for Better Organic SERPs

In light of all the changes from Google, this last article from Search Engine Watch explores the possibility that links may no longer be a ranking factor in the future. Yandex, the biggest search engine in Russia, has just recently announced that they will be no longer using links as a ranking factor and this article looks at how this change might actually have an international impact and indicate the way in which search is heading.

Thanks for reading!

The Weekly Shop (24th – 28th March)

Hello and welcome to The Weekly Shop. In this edition, we look at how you can create engaging packaging experiences, online videos, Pinterest tools, e-mail segmentation case studies and how mobile is fast becoming the dominate channel in search marketing.

The secret to amazing packaging experiences

For any ecommerce company, a shipped package represents one of the most direct touch points to the customer, but it’s also often under-utilised when re-marketing to customers. This article from Econsultancy explores how ecommerce stores can create engaging in-package experiences that bring customers back onto your website or mobile app using examples from the likes of Apple, Birchbox and Bonobos.

96% of consumers find video useful when buying online

A new study from Animoto, an online video creation site, has shown how online video is increasing in importance and effectiveness when it comes to purchase decisions. Their research found that nearly three quarters of consumers are more likely to purchase a product or service if they can watch a video explaining it beforehand. There’s more on the stats over on Econsultancy.

How retailers can make the most of Pinterest tools

With Pinterest users showing more passion than Facebook users do, as its content is shared more often and has a much longer shelf life, it’s becoming increasingly important to ensure Pinterest has a prominent spot on your list of marketing priorities. If you need some inspiration for your Pinterest strategy, then this article from Econsultancy outlines the ways in which retailers can make most of Pinterest tools.

10 case studies that show the power of email segmentation

E-mail marketing still remains one of the most effective channels for driving traffic and conversions but to really reap the benefits, it’s important to personalise your campaigns based on user demographics and behaviours. To show why this tactic is so important, Econsultancy have rounded up 10 case studies from businesses that have improved their traffic or conversions using segmentation.

Mobile To Drive 50 Percent Of Google Paid Search Clicks By End Of 2015 [Study]

Last week, Marin Software released its 2014 annual mobile search advertising report. By digging deeper into its own data on mobile ad performance for Google, Marin has predicted that mobile devices will account for 50 per cent of all paid search clicks globally by December 2015. Although based on U.S data, this study highlights how mobile is fast becoming the dominate channel in search marketing as shoppers increasingly research products online.

Thanks for reading.

The Weekly Shop (3rd – 7th March)

In the Weekly Shop this week…a possible overhaul of the current business rates system, the changing face of retail, and a study which has revealed a major increase in online shopping.

Business rates ‘not fit for purpose’ as retail goes digital: MP

Good news for independent high street retailers this week as the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee (BISC) called for a major overhaul of the business rates system. The BISC commented that business rates system is no longer fit for purchase in a multichannel world where retail sales are moving online and rates should be based on turnover rather than property value. We’re interested to see how this develops.

Brands, technology and the changing face of retail

Earlier in the week, The Guardian ran a roundtable discussion for senior retailers to debate the pressing issue of how retailers can offer shoppers a seamless experience as technology transforms shopping habits. The discussion was held under the Chatham House rule which allows comments to be reported without attribution and revealed some interesting insights.

A third of online sales now made via a mobile device, suggests IMRG study

One in three of all UK online sales are now made on a mobile device, according to a new study from the IMRG Capgemini Quarterly Benchmarking (Q4 2013/4). Significantly, online clothing and fashion retailers have a higher mobile commerce penetration rate, with 36% of sales completed via smartphones and tablets in the fourth quarter. More on this study over on Internet Retailing.

The Best and Worst Thing to Ever Happen to SEO

Next up is the first in two articles looking how SEO has changed as a discipline. This first article from Wired looks at how Google encrypting searches and withholding search referral data has been the best and also the worst thing to happen to SEO.

How Fast Is SEO Really Changing? A Look Back At Search Ranking Factors

This last article looks at the Search Ranking Factors studies by well-known SEO Rand Fishkin who has been churning out perceptive SEO insights every two years since 2005. Search Engine Land have put together a summary of highlights from the reports which shows how the findings have changed throughout the eight years which have revealed some interesting trends. Useful if you’re struggling to justify SEO investments.

See you next week!

The Weekly Shop (24th – 28th Feb)

In the Weekly Shop this week…how to improve customer experience when items are out of stock and attract registrations without creating a barrier at the checkout, plus the growing importance of online reviews and insights into how the way we’re shopping is changing.

How to improve customer experience when products are out of stock

We probably all know how frustrating it is to find the perfect item online and then later discover that it’s actually out of stock. This article from Econsultancy tackles the out of stock problem online retailers are encountering today and looks at ways you can improve customer experience when items are out of stock to induce the users to make a purchase, either on the same session or in the future.

How to attract registrations without creating a barrier to checkout

Registration has its benefits to both customers and retailers, yet often a forced registration can be perceived as a barrier by customers. This next article looks at how well designed checkouts can reduce customer abandonment while still encouraging people to register with examples of best practice from ASOS, Macy’s and House of Fraser. 

77% of UK shoppers consult reviews before buying online: report

It probably won’t come as a surprise to hear that reviews are an important feature of any ecommerce site. Nonetheless, a new survey from Trustpilot has found that three out of four British shoppers (77%) consult online reviews before buying online, showing that clearly reviews are incredibly important for driving conversions. To further highlight the importance of reviews, here’s a roundup of data taken from several other studies which show the impact they have on driving conversions.

Online shoppers move from PC to mobile as they shop more often, but with five or fewer retailers

More research this week has revealed insights into how the way we’re shopping is changing. The study found that fewer shoppers are using their PC to buy online and are turning to smartphones and tablets. Other interesting findings included the statistic that 57% of UK online shoppers buy with five or fewer online retailers. Asked why they shopped at their top three retailers, 85% cited trust, and 79% price. More over on Internet Retailing.

 

That’s it for this week! If you’d like to receive The Weekly Shop by email every Friday, then please do pop your email address in the footer below.