The Weekly Shop (19th – 23rd May)

It’s Friday so that means a new edition of our Weekly Shop! This week, we look at insights from Social Media London, ugly websites, Google’s release of the Panda 4.0 algorithm and insights from Econsultancy’s new Search Engine Marketing Benchmark Report.

Real-time Twitter marketing & personalisation – top takeaways from #smlondon

This week, Alice Reeves, our senior social media and content consultant attended Social Media London’s May event, which was focused on how brands can make the most of ‘real-time’ Twitter marketing and personalise their social channels to boost engagement. You can read her key takeaways from the conference here.

What if Your Ugly Website is Holding Back Your Marketing Efforts? – Whiteboard Friday

Last week, in Moz’s weekly Whiteboard Friday series they discussed the subject of ugly websites and whether they can actually hold you back from the kinds of levels of engagement and progress that you could be making.

Google Begins Rolling Out Panda 4.0 Now

This week Google’s Matt Cutts announced on Twitter that they have released version 4.0 of the Google Panda algorithm which is designed to prevent sites with poor quality content from working their way into Google’s top search results. It sounds like this update will be a gentler Panda Algorithm and lay the groundwork for future changes in that direction.

Five key insights from our Search Engine Marketing Benchmark Report

This next article from Econsultancy highlights five of the key insights from their Search Engine Marketing Benchmark Report which contains a comprehensive analysis of the UK search marketing environment. The report, covering search engine optimisation (SEO or natural search), paid search (PPC), social media marketing and display advertising, is based on an online survey of more than 700 client-side digital marketers and agencies and reveals some interesting insights.

Thanks for reading. See you next week!

A round-up of Brighton SEO

At the end of last month I attended the best Brighton SEO yet. From the opening keynote to the afternoon’s content-focused talks in the Corn Exchange, the day was packed with actionable takeaways. However, the five talks that really stood out for me were:

  • How I Earned Loads of Links by Ignoring SEO – Malcolm Coles
  • The Habits That Land You Links – Stacey Cavanagh
  • How journalistic principles will shape the digital marketing of tomorrow – Julia Ogden
  • Using Content for Direct Response – Matt Evans
  • The Content Marketing Blueprint for Boring Industries – Mike Essex

Below, you’ll find my summaries (largely taken from my frantically scrawled notes) of the key points from each talk plus links to slide decks where available.

How I Earned Loads of Links by Ignoring SEO – Malcolm Coles

The conference kicked off with a keynote from Malcolm Coles, General Manager at The Daily Mirror and founder of UsVsTh3m. Malcolm spoke about how UsVsTh3m’s goal has always been to gain the biggest share of their traffic through social rather than search. They’ve achieved this through creating topical, highly shareable content in the form of games and quizzes, such as:

  • The ‘Where’s Damascus?’ Game – thousands of people played the game online and failed miserably, including people from the Houses of Parliament, which resulted in news coverage.
  • How Much Are You Hated By The Daily Mail? – though impossible to get to the end of unless you’re Michael Gove, this short piece of interactive content attracted over a million players, multiple pieces of online coverage with hugely authoritative links and caused UsVsTh3m to rank 3rd for the search term ‘Daily Mail’ for months.

Malcolm also spoke about how The Daily Mirror now sees more mobile traffic than desktop. Therefore, you must ensure that any content you outreach to publications (e.g. infographics) needs to look good on mobile. Your outreach email will probably be read in mobile too. What’s more, infographics sent as huge JPEGs won’t look good on mobile – these should be created in HTML and should be responsive. When UsVsTh3m launched their ‘Northometer’ quiz, 85% of plays came from mobile. In fact, the entire UsVsTh3m site is designed for mobile – Malcolm even went as far as to say that they “don’t really care” how it looks on desktop.

The most important takeaway of Malcolm’s talk was about content headlines. The best-performing headlines are interesting (you want to read them) and mysterious (they don’t give too much away) – these are the headlines that get you clicks AND shares.

Essentially, online content can be divided down into four categories: 

  • Gets clicked AND shared (what goes viral)
  • Gets clicked NOT shared (tends to be content that includes swearing – after all, “your Mum is on Facebook”)
  • Gets shared NOT clicked (rubbish headlines, but good content)
  • Doesn’t get shared OR clicked (most online content) 

You want your content to fall into the top category and sites like Buzzfeed work extremely hard to get this right – it’s standard for them to A/B test up to 25 different headlines for each piece of content.

Three more key points from Malcolm’s talk were:

  • If you’re creating content that’s getting shared, the most important thing is that it’s visual – this means people writing about it are forced to link to it because it’s not something that they can describe with the same level of impact
  • The reason quizzes work so well when it comes to generating content that gets shared is because people want to share content that’s self-affirming – i.e. it reinforces the way that people perceive themselves and/or want to be perceived by others
  • Use Facebook Ads to deliver niche content to the right people – when people in a niche start talking about something, it’s likely to get picked up by relevant publications

The Habits That Land You Links – Stacey Cavanagh

Next up was Stacey Cavanagh, Head of Search at Tecmark, talking about getting into the habits that land you links. Stacey spoke about the importance of allowing time to be creative, championing the 6-3-5 method which enables six people to generate 108 ideas in 30 minutes. Next, you should use NUF testing (New, Useful, Feasible) to work out which ideas are worth following up – score each idea out of ten for each of these things and prioritise the highest scoring ideas.

Additional takeaways from Stacey’s talk were:

  • Use a tool such as fivesecondtest.com to A/B test the effectiveness of your tweets
  • Don’t underestimate the importance of having a Flickr page with high quality, original images – ensure all images have a Creative Commons attribution license and include direction as to how to attribute
  • Have regular image reclamation sessions – imageraider.com helps to find sites using your images, then you can request attribution and a link
  • Create stories from surveys – this is a great tactic for getting news links, even if you just write a story about it (you don’t need a fancy infographic to get quality links)
  • Don’t underestimate the effectiveness of offline content – e.g. doing something “real” that results in coverage; links are a by-product of coverage
  • Old-fashioned communications are disruptive – when it comes to outreaching to your contacts, doing something like sending a hand-written letter will get you more attention than an email

How journalistic principles will shape the digital marketing of tomorrow Julia Ogden 

Julia was a journalist before she went on to work at Zazzle. Her talk was about how she’s used the skills she learnt while working in local media to inform her digital marketing tactics. Key points were:

  • Most people don’t read more than 250 words of a piece of content so make sure all the important information is at the top – the introduction to any piece of content needs to hook the reader and make them want to read on
  • The internet is crying out for high quality, well-written content – in essence, this is all that “SEO content” is
  • Content marketers should take advantage of the citizen journalism approach and crowd-source content from brand advocates and social influencers
  • Google rewards a website/business which has a range of followed links, no follow links and even just online mentions – Google recently released a patent to reward content that just mentions a brand or associated keywords, but has no links
  • When you’re creating content, always think about what’s new or different – why should people care about what you have to say?

 Using Content for Direct Response Matt Evans

It was Matt’s first time speaking at Brighton SEO and I thought his talk was one of the most useful from the day. Matt spoke at length about selling through content and provided some really great takeaways.

In essence, we’ve stopped stuffing Google with keywords and started stuffing it with content – but what so many online marketers overlook is that the sales funnel is content.

Matt outlined that there are four stages of the sales funnel that your consumers go through:

  • Unaware – content at this stage should catch peoples’ attention
  • Know the situation – content at this stage should inform people of the situation
  • Product awareness – content at this stage should inform people about the product
  • Purchase intent – content at this stage should push people to sale

Too often, content created “for SEO” overlooks this and completely misses the sales process:

  • Your content should inform your audience – because an informed audience is more likely to purchase
  • Get your content in the right place at the right time – tailor your content to what your audience want / need to see at each stage of the buying journey 
  • Re-market to your content, not just your products – use your content to move your potential customers down the funnel until they’re ready to purchase
  • Don’t underestimate the importance of post-purchase campaigns – it costs 5 x more to acquire a new customer than to sell again to an existing customer
  • Stop thinking about links first – create content with a real purpose

The Content Marketing Blueprint for Boring Industries – Mike Essex

Mike Essex from Koozai spoke about how we’re so obsessed with “great content” that we often totally overlook that fact that “boring content” is actually the best opportunity in content marketing. Great content might achieve awareness, but boring content is what sells.

Opportunities to create boring content include:

  • Your ‘About’ section
  • Technical specifications
  • Press releases (these are still important and great for targeting niche audiences, which can be critically important)
  • Company location pages

Ways that you can achieve stand-out “boring content” are:

  • Repackage boring content in a visually interesting way  – e.g. highly visual technical specification pages
  • Distil your product information down into simple-to-follow comparisons – sometimes you have to focus on what stops people buying and create content to address this
  • Think about customer aftercare – for example, other sites were ranking for Vax user guides so Vax invested in creating their own
  • Have great product pages – Aviva are a great example of a company which uses its product pages to give them a competitive edge

Above all, remember that on-site content such as this MUST convert – that should always be your end goal!

 

 

 

The Weekly Shop (5th – 9th May)

Hello and welcome to Leapfrogg’s Weekly Shop. In this edition, we talk about Twitter and Amazon’s new partnership, how to build and measure gains in customer loyalty, PPC misconceptions and 7 SEO truths that you really can’t ignore.

How Amazon is using Twitter to sell through social media

This week, Amazon and Twitter unveiled a new partnership that allows customers to buy from the retailer via the use of the #AmazonBasket hashtag on Twitter. It certainly marks an interesting step forward in social commerce but is it anything more than a gimmick? Econsultancy explores its usefulness here.

How Waitrose is using omnichannel in a strategy aimed at setting itself apart

Waitrose is a great example of a retailer using omnichannel to set itself apart. Internet Retailing visited Waitrose’s just-opened Swindon branch to see how the supermarket is bringing digital and the store together to create new ways of shopping.

Customer Loyalty Restarts with Every Experience

Allegiance to your brand begins again with every experience, from word-of-mouth mentions to social status updates that are passed around and shared. This next article explores the actionable steps that you can take to systematically build and measure gains in loyalty.

10 Reasons to Hire a PPC Management Expert

PPC advertising has the potential to deliver targeted traffic, but it takes technical know-how to do it properly. This article from Search Engine Watch explores reasons why it will cost you less to hire an expert than it will to launch a campaign on your own.

4 Social PPC Misconceptions

While we’re on the topic of PPC, Social PPC has been around for several years, and is becoming mainstream in the PPC world. Because social PPC is still relatively new, there are many mistaken beliefs about it which this article from Search Engine Land aims to clear up.

7 SEO Truths Every Business Leader Must Understand

Lastly, here’s a useful article from Search Engine Land, which provides seven SEO truths every business leader in 2014 and beyond must understand.

Thanks for reading!

What does the future hold for the Google+ platform?

Last week it was announced that Vic Gundotra – “The Father of Google+” – was leaving the company after eight years. Justifiably, this has sparked plenty of speculation about the future of the social platform, with TechCrunch going so far as to describe Google+ as “the walking dead.”

Since its launch, brands and business have been weaving Google+ not just into their social campaigns but wider natural search strategy. Here’s our round-up of some of the past week’s discussions around developments at Google+ along with our thoughts about what the future may hold for the platform.

Division and evolution

TechCrunch posit their article entitled Google+ is Walking Dead that: “Google+ will no longer be considered a product, but a platform – essentially ending its competition with other social networks like Facebook and Twitter.”

This makes complete sense, seeing as Google+ has failed to generate anywhere near the number of daily active users (within the social stream specifically) that Facebook achieves.

TechCrunch also highlights Google’s statement, which has been quoted in all the additional discussions we’ve read, that Gundotra’s departure “has no impact on our Google+ strategy – we have an incredibly talented team that will continue to build great user experiences across Google+, Hangouts and Photos.”

While there may be no impending changes planned, this comment could be an indicator that these three things end up being separated out into three different products, with Google+ evolving into something else entirely.

Advertising gold dust

In his article, The Impending Demise of Google+ for State of Digital, Barry Adams writes that we should “prepare for a dramatic shift in how Google+ is positioned, and how we as digital marketers are currently using the platform.”

Adams’ view is that the platform is unlikely to disappear altogether as Google has invested too much in acquisition of “advertising gold dust” surrounding users’ connections (via Circles) online activity and device usage. However, he agrees that it has “truly and irrevocably failed” as a social network.

Personalised search

Over at Marketing Land, Danny Sullivan is likewise sceptical that Google will make the decision to kill off Google+ completely. In What Would Happen if Google Really Did Kill Google+?  Sullivan compares Google’s attempt to rival Facebook to Bing’s attempt to challenge Google’s supremacy in search.

His view is that even if Google+ ceases to exist in its current incarnation, Google Accounts would still be a product “perhaps with a profile page, perhaps offering all the integration with Google services as there is now. It just wouldn’t be called Google+.”

Sullivan also points out that Google+ data is largely what’s been used by Google to deliver personalised search results. Without Google+ personalisation will be harder, but – on the flip side – could mean that Google starts to take into account social signals from other accounts such as Facebook and Twitter.

The social stream

Last but not least, in a Recode article headlined Minus its Leader, What’s Left at Google+? Liz Gannes and Mike Isaac suggest that the future of Google+ could see the platform divided up several distinct parts:

• Social stream
• Photos
• Messaging / hangouts
• Identity (Google sign-in)

They observe that “the Facebook-like social stream seems to have the least support, with multiple current Google employees expressing scepticism that it is worth keeping around.” Despite serving 300 million active monthly users (according to Oct 2013 figures), this is still a long way from Facebook’s user base of over a billion monthly active users.

Our thoughts on Google+

In summary, nobody knows what Google are planning for Google+. We’ll be continuing to use the platform as a social network both as an agency and on behalf of our clients, but at the same time preparing ourselves for the fact there’s likely to be a re-positioning in the way the platform sells itself to brands and users.
Despite Google’s assurance that nothing is changing (for now) we’d certainly be thinking about moving your focus away from direct engagement within the social stream – think the opposite of your Facebook strategy – and focusing on the asset creation and sharing capabilities that Google+ can offer your brand such as photos and hangouts.

Remember also that data such as reviews and page summaries are still being pulled into the SERPs, therefore it’s important to have an active presence, while personalisation is informed by Google login data. It seems that – for the time being anyway – Google+ is here to stay.

Alice Reeves on Google+

The Weekly Shop (28th April – 2nd May)

Welcome to another edition of The Weekly Shop. This week we take a look at how Instagram blows other social networks away for engagement, the future of Google+, luxury brands and their online presences and how social media impacts SEO.

Instagram ‘blows other social networks away’ for engagement, delivering 58 times more interactions than Facebook, says Forrester

According to a new report from Forrester, Instagram is the stand-out social network when it comes to delivering engagement. The study was based on three million user interactions with over 2,500 brands and found that while Facebook and Twitter may dominate in terms of user base, people on the networks are less inclined to like, comment or share posts. More over on The Drum.

What does the future hold for the Google+?

Earlier in the week, the man who created Google+, Vic Gundotra, announced he was leaving Google after eight years. Justifiably, this has sparked plenty of speculation about the future of the social platform. Our senior social media and content consultant, Alice, has rounded-up some of the past week’s discussions around developments at Google+ along with our thoughts on what the future may hold for the platform.

High street set to drive 89% of sales by 2020 as shopping evolves: study

O2’s The Future of Retail report predicts that the role of the high street is set for a sea change as shopping evolves still further into a leisure activity. Analysis has calculated that a high street presence will influence retail sales worth as much as £338.5bn a year by 2020. Without stores, online sales would fall by as much as £52bn.

Where are luxury brands going wrong online?

The next two articles from Econsultancy explore luxury brands and their online presences. In this first post, Graham Charlton, looks at what makes a website luxurious, and where some luxury brands are going wrong with examples from the likes of Chanel, Dolce and Gabbana, Manolo Blahnik and Bang & Olufsen.

Five great ecommerce sites from luxury brands

Following on from the above, this second article takes a look at the elements that give sites a luxury feel using some examples of brands that are doing this well by successfully blending style and user experiences.

7 Legitimate Ways That Social Media Impacts SEO

In search news this week, this article from Clickz looks at how social media and SEO overlap and how social can contribute to the overall success of websites in several ways with seven specific examples.

5 New SEO Mantras to Replace Old, Inefficient Thinking

There’s no doubt that SEO has changed and evolved and definitely for the better. This last article from Search Engine Watch provides five new mantras to replace old and inefficient ways of thinking that have permeated across the search industry.

The Weekly Shop (24th – 28th March)

Hello and welcome to The Weekly Shop. In this edition, we look at how you can create engaging packaging experiences, online videos, Pinterest tools, e-mail segmentation case studies and how mobile is fast becoming the dominate channel in search marketing.

The secret to amazing packaging experiences

For any ecommerce company, a shipped package represents one of the most direct touch points to the customer, but it’s also often under-utilised when re-marketing to customers. This article from Econsultancy explores how ecommerce stores can create engaging in-package experiences that bring customers back onto your website or mobile app using examples from the likes of Apple, Birchbox and Bonobos.

96% of consumers find video useful when buying online

A new study from Animoto, an online video creation site, has shown how online video is increasing in importance and effectiveness when it comes to purchase decisions. Their research found that nearly three quarters of consumers are more likely to purchase a product or service if they can watch a video explaining it beforehand. There’s more on the stats over on Econsultancy.

How retailers can make the most of Pinterest tools

With Pinterest users showing more passion than Facebook users do, as its content is shared more often and has a much longer shelf life, it’s becoming increasingly important to ensure Pinterest has a prominent spot on your list of marketing priorities. If you need some inspiration for your Pinterest strategy, then this article from Econsultancy outlines the ways in which retailers can make most of Pinterest tools.

10 case studies that show the power of email segmentation

E-mail marketing still remains one of the most effective channels for driving traffic and conversions but to really reap the benefits, it’s important to personalise your campaigns based on user demographics and behaviours. To show why this tactic is so important, Econsultancy have rounded up 10 case studies from businesses that have improved their traffic or conversions using segmentation.

Mobile To Drive 50 Percent Of Google Paid Search Clicks By End Of 2015 [Study]

Last week, Marin Software released its 2014 annual mobile search advertising report. By digging deeper into its own data on mobile ad performance for Google, Marin has predicted that mobile devices will account for 50 per cent of all paid search clicks globally by December 2015. Although based on U.S data, this study highlights how mobile is fast becoming the dominate channel in search marketing as shoppers increasingly research products online.

Thanks for reading.

The Weekly Shop (17th – 21st March)

In the Weekly Shop this week…the four types of customer insight retailers should have, simplifying channel attribution, Facebook’s new video adverts and more!

Customer insight – what you should know and why

Our first article this week comes from Leapfrogg’s MD, Rosie Freshwater, who has revealed the four different types of insight that we believe all retailers should have about their customers. When combined together, this insight gives a true picture of who your customers are, the shopping experience they desire and how much they are likely to spend.

Introducing The Periodic Table of Content Marketing

Here’s a clever visualisation from Chris Lake from Econsultancy. He’s created a periodic table of content marketing, which is a rather useful referral tool when thinking about content campaigns.

Channel attribution doesn’t have to be a complicated issue

Channel attribution is often seen as being overly complicated, but this article aims to simplify the process and show that it can actually be quite straightforward. A useful read if you’re thinking about the affiliate arena and using attribution tools or a specialist company.

Facebook Says Video Ads to Hit News Feed ‘Over the Next Few Months’

In Facebook news this week, the social network has just announced that they are going to be rolling out video adverts in users’ news feeds over the next couple of months. These 15-second ads will auto-play within the news feed, but will be soundless unless you click on them and will be measured in a similar way to how advertisers buy and measure ads on TV.

International SEO Tips – What Are the Game Changing Factors?

Moving onto the topic of SEO, if you’re thinking about the internationalisation of your website, then this article outlines some international SEO best practice tips and describes what they are, and how they work.

So…You Think SEO Has Changed?

To finish off this week, here’s an article from Clickz which quite rightly aims to debunk the theory that ‘SEO is dead.’ Head over to Search Engine Land for more.

Thanks for reading! Remember you can sign up to receive the Weekly Shop via email every Friday by signing up in the footer below.

Fever London’s Perfect Fit Model Competition

Fever London is one of Britain’s most exciting independent fashion brands, with collections inspired by beautiful vintage prints and feminine silhouettes. We’ve been working with the brand since October 2013 looking after their natural search strategy. To date, this has involved integrating their content, social media and online PR activity to help establish the brand as an authority on vintage fashion.

As part of our on-going work, last month we supported Fever London with the launch and promotion of their Perfect Fit Model Competition. Our mission was to find five ‘real life’ models in a variety of different dress sizes who would take part in a photo shoot in and model key pieces from Fever London’s SS14 collection. From April 2014, these images will be featured on product pages on Fever London’s website to show exactly what each design would look like on real women in sizes 8 to 16.

We developed this campaign specifically to grow and increase engagement of Fever London’s social media audience across all platforms, particularly Facebook. We also wanted to boost online brand awareness for Fever London by contacting relevant fashion and vintage bloggers and publications about the competition.

The competition launched on Facebook in January and we were thrilled with the coverage and buzz it received. There were 65 entries for the competition and a whopping 11,900 votes were cast! The final winners were Catherine of Not Dressed as Lamb, Deborah of Bang on Style, Elizabeth of What Lizzy Loves, Celina and Nikki who all received the most votes in their size category from Fever London’s Facebook fans.

Last Saturday, the five competition winners headed up to Fever London’s headquarters and spent the day being pampered and styled for their photo shoot. Our senior social media and content consultant Alice also went along to capture all the action on the day and we thought it would be nice to share some of her photos. I think you’ll all agree the models looked fabulous!

This campaign received a huge amount of buzz online and some of the positive coverage the campaign received is below:

Should we have models that are all different sizes? 

What online retailers can learn from Fever London’s ‘perfect fit’ campaign

The final images from the models’ photo shoot will be up on the Fever London website on the 1st April and we will also be sharing a full case study about this work shortly. Watch this space!

Deborah being made-up with her vintage-inspired hair do.

Nikki modelling in the Fever shop window.

Celina modelling the Chelsea Pencil Dress outside the Fever London studio.

Deborah of the blog ‘Bang on Style blog’ modelling the Arlington Maxi Dress.

Three of the lovely competition winners modelling a Fever London top and skinny jeans.

 The five competition winners posing outside Fever London.

Wedding Rings Direct ‘Bride of the Year’ campaign

In light of our recent nomination for the European Search Awards we thought the time was ripe to share a few more details about our work with Wedding Rings Direct and the ’Bride of the Year campaign’, which earned us a nomination in the ‘Best Use of PR in a Search Campaign’ category.

Wedding Rings Direct offers the largest collection of quality engagement, wedding and eternity rings in the UK. We first started working with them at the beginning of 2013 when they approached us to help them increase brand exposure, customer acquisition and revenue having suffered a significant drop in natural search traffic as a result of Google updates and subsequent penalties.

As part of their strategy, we came up with the idea of a Bride of The Year campaign, aimed at raising brand awareness and boosting social media engagement, whilst also building a number of high quality editorial links.

At the launch of the campaign, we asked friends and family of brides set to marry in 2014 to nominate the brides-to-be with photo and the reason they deserved to be Bride of the Year. We then approached wedding related businesses with strong blog domains to help us publicise the competition, whilst also inviting them to donate items or services for the winner’s prize package in return for media coverage.

When the competition launched, we used an ‘old school’ PR approach via press releases and calls to the local media and relevant wedding bloggers. This secured us coverage in the main local newspaper, whilst also gaining editorial links from bloggers.

In order to generate social media buzz, we created a contest app for Wedding Rings Direct’s Facebook page where brides-to-be could be nominated and then voted for by family and friends. To encourage the highest number of entries possible, we supported Facebook activity with advertising, accompanied by sponsored stories to extend reach even further.

Bride of The Year Competition

There were a total of 28 entries to the competition with each entry receiving an average of 65 votes and six comments per entry. Bride of the Year content was shared on Facebook 12,322 times during the two months the competition was live.

In October– after receiving more than 800 public votes– Rosa Lee from Brighton was crowned Bride of the Year 2014, receiving a set of bespoke wedding rings as part of a prize package worth more than £1,500.

Bride of The Year Winner

The winning bride receiving her wedding rings from Wedding Rings Direct

Campaign highlights included:

  • 17 pieces of coverage from the media and wedding bloggers about the competition and winner
  • 10,185 unique visitors to the competition on Facebook
  • 84% increase in Facebook fans
  • 41 high quality, editorial links from a variety of domains over the four months of the campaign (exceeding the target of 30)

In addition, year-on-year natural search traffic is now tracking above the pre-penalty level for the first time in twelve months.

Kate Rivera, Marketing Manager at Wedding Rings Direct said “We are so pleased with how the Bride of the Year campaign performed from both a brand awareness and social activity perspective. We increased our Facebook followers significantly and the campaign also allowed three months of daily social interaction with our audience across multiple social platforms including Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Pinterest.”

We’ve thoroughly enjoyed working on this campaign and were very happy to hear that due to the success of the competition, Wedding Rings Direct would like us to repeat and expand the competition nationally in 2014.

Watch this space for more details… and wish us luck with the European Search Awards!

 

European Search Awards Shortlist Badge

 

 

 

The Weekly Shop (17th – 21st Feb)

In the Weekly Shop this week…three reports yielding some interesting stats around retail spending, poor tablet experience and the state of digital on the high street, plus what Facebook’s latest algorithm updates mean for your brands Facebook page and ways in which search is evolving.

Three quarters of retail spending in UK comes from just 18 per cent of shoppers

A new study from Deloitte has found that nearly three quarters of the money spent shopping in Britain comes from just 18 per cent of consumers. These ‘Super Shoppers’ are increasingly making purchases using their mobile and account for a massive 70 per cent of all UK retail spending which is the equivalent of more than £200billion in 2013.

Audi to Apple: who is using digital on the high street?

A recent report by Eccomplished assessed over 40 leading retailers in the heart of London’s shopping district on their use of digital technology to evaluate how good retailers are at delivering a multichannel shopping experience. Econsultancy have rounded up some specific retailers from the report who are using digital technology successfully to engage customers in-store and also retailers who are doing otherwise.

77% of shoppers say a poor tablet experience could change the way they perceive a brand, study finds

Our final report this week has revealed that more than three quarters of consumers say a dissatisfying shopping experience using a tablet would impact their opinion of a brand. Furthermore, 67 per cent of shoppers stated that it would make them reluctant to recommend the retailer to family and friend highlighting the fact that retailers simply cannot afford to neglect tablets as shopping devices.

6 Ways to Make People Love Your Brand

In order to gain customers and retain them, you’ve got to do more than introduce them to your brand, business, or products – you’ve got to make them fall in love with it. Mashable have produced an insightful infographic telling you just how this can be done.

Websites Need to Become as Personalised as Email

Marketers have become very sophisticated at personalising emails based on their data to ensure their campaigns are as targeted and engaging as possible. Websites, on the other hand have lagged far behind when the tools exist to make websites as targeted as emails. This article from Clickz looks at four ways you can segment and target visitors on your website to provide them with a more personalised experience.

What Facebook’s latest algorithm updates mean for your brands Facebook page

If you manage a Facebook Page for your business, you’ve probably noticed that your content isn’t reaching as many people as it was a few months ago. In this blog post our senior social media and content consultant, Alice, has explored why this has happened and how allocating a small amount to Facebook Advertising can provide a huge benefit to your Facebook page.

Five ways in which search is evolving

This last article from Econsultancy looks at five noteworthy ways in which search is evolving and what digital marketers need to be aware of including mobile, content and user experience signals.

See you next week!