The Weekly Shop (14th – 18th July)

This week’s Weekly Shop has a retail focus as we take a look at retail game changers, tweaks to increase ecommerce conversions, how consumers take longer to decide what to buy thanks to technology and Pinterest’s new follow button.

Top ten tweaks to increase ecommerce conversions

Many online retailers focus on growing overall site traffic, which often comes at the expense of increasing conversion rates from existing customers. This can be counter productive as the cost of acquiring new traffic is always increasing, so it makes sense to convert the customers that already visit your site and abandon before making a purchase. To help you do this, the guys over at Econsultancy have put together their top ten tweaks smart retailers have made to successfully boost their conversions.House of Fraser ecommerce pageImage source: https://econsultancy.com

New study reveals how much online shoppers are prepared to lose rather than make a fuss

A new study has revealed that British online shoppers are willing to lose over £20 before taking the effort to make a complaint. Unsurprisingly, the survey also shows they are unlikely to make a repeat purchase, following bad customer service and will hold a grudge against the retailer. The research showed UK customers are losing out on over £777 million every year by not claiming on faulty/no show online purchases, showing that your customers may not be as happy with their purchases as you might think they might be.

Consumers take longer to decide what to buy – thanks to technology

Another study this week has found that ecommerce and related technologies mean that consumers are taking longer to decide what to buy. The report suggests that customers are now more willing to wait for good value with 70% now say they hardly ever buy at full price, and 60% say they’ll always wait for a product to be on offer. It is apparent that impulse purchasing has given way to planned purchasing as online has made it easier to save items and compare ranges and prices.

Pinterest Adds New Follow Button to Boost Brand Discovery

Pinterest has further enhanced its discovery capabilities by adding an animated ‘Follow’ button with a pop up window showcasing the brands most recent pins. By offering this new way of previewing pins, users will be more likely to follow a brand, as they will have a better-defined idea of the exact content they can expect to see.

Nordstrom Pinterest Follow us pop up

Image source: http://www.adweek.com/

What are the retail game changers?

To finish off this week, an article from the IMRG about the biggest retail game changers which includes Amazon, the shift in the balance of power between retailers and consumers and convenience.

The Weekly Shop (23rd – 27th June)

Hello, and welcome to this week’s Weekly Shop. This week we take a look at new consumer laws, modern age SEO myths, content marketing tips for small businesses and creating a single view of stock.

New consumer laws and their impact on retailers

In retail news this this week, two sets of consumer laws have been announced that are set to have a major impact on UK retailers. The two pieces of legislation make substantial changes to consumers’ contractual rights and as a result of these changes, retailers must ensure that they comply with these new consumer laws by updating both their standard consumer agreements and consumer facing procedures accordingly.

Doddle rolls into stations across the UK

Doodle Parcel Shop

Image source: networkrail.co.uk

Also this week, Doodle, the UK’s first fully dedicated and staffed online shopping collection and returns service has announced it will open in 300 new locations in the next three years. Doodle operates in railway stations and major hubs, and is partnering with a number of well-known retailers including Asos and New Look. We’re looking forward to trailing the service when it launches in Brighton.

Creating a single view of stock: five key considerations

Adopting a single view of your stock across retail channels is an essential precursor to a true multichannel strategy. This next article from Econsultancy provides five key factors for retailers need to consider when looking to create a single view of their stock.

Uh-Oh…Looks Like We Might Have Lost the Customer

Here’s a good, quick read on the importance of creating a customer centric business from Clickz. The article highlights the three key questions you need to be asking yourself when migrating to a customer-centric organisation, versus a product-centric organisation.

Pinterest Moves a Step Closer to Search Engine With Guided Search

Pinterest has recently announced that it will be rolling out guided search on Pinterest over the next few weeks, as it did for its mobile app in April. Pinterest users will soon see a new search bar when they visit Pinterest.com, and just as it works on mobile, the search features will surface recommended keywords intended to help generate more specific queries and better search results. These adjustments to Pinterest functionality over time demonstrate the site’s vision for the future.

7 Outstanding Content Marketing Tips for Small Businesses

As SEO has evolved in recent years, it has become clear that small businesses need to adopt the content marketing strategies that corporate marketers use to remain competitive in rankings. If you’re struggling for creative ideas for interesting new content, then this article from Search Engine Watch provides seven tips for providing outstanding content.

7 Modern Age SEO Myths

One of the challenges that the world of SEO presents us with is its lack of clarity as search engines obscure and continuously tune their algorithms. This insightful article from Forbes aims to draw a bigger picture of how you need to process the claims that people make about SEO and debunks some of the newer myths about SEO that have emerged only in the past few years.

Thanks for reading!

The Weekly Shop (26th – 30th May)

Hello, and welcome to another edition of Leapfrogg’s Weekly Shop. This week we feature articles about why people don’t trust your website, Twitter advertising, key takeaways from SheerLuxeB2B and the EU’s privacy ruling on Google.

44 reasons why people don’t trust your website

To kick us off this week, Chris Lake from Econsultancy has explored the reasons why people may not trust your website using insight from a post on reddit. Reasons range from content, design choices and the usability of a website and is well worth a read to make sure you’re not guilty of any of these.

Top 5 Learnings from Twitter Advertising

Earlier this year, Twitter launched Twitter Advertising which allows UK businesses to advertise on the platform. We’ve been running Twitter ads for a number of our clients for several months now, and our paid search analyst has provided his top five tips for using the platform over on the Froggblog.

Silos, Cycle Teams and Chief Customer Officers: Key Take Aways from Sheerluxe 2014

A few weeks ago, we were proud to speak at the SheerB2B - a conference which brings together experts from the world of online retail to help premium etailers successfully grow their online businesses. Ometria have written a round-up of their key takeaways from the conference, which includes our MD’s talk on five of the major challenges faced by retailers in trying to meet customer expectations and staying ahead of the competition.

5 Fast Facts about the EU’s Privacy Ruling on Google

On May 13th, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled against Google in a landmark privacy case, asserting that EU citizens have a “right to be forgotten.” This article from Search Engine Watch dives into some of the facts to provide some insight into what this means.

Thanks for reading! Remember you can sign up to receive The Weekly Shop via email every Friday by signing up in the footer below.

Our top five recommendations for Twitter advertising

Recently Twitter launched the ability for all businesses in the UK to advertise on its platform. As a digital marketing agency, we quickly wanted to test the benefits this new advertising channel could bring to our retail clients. Having run Twitter ads for several months now, we have gathered some learning’s and recommendations about our experience which we have outlined below.

1. Tailor tweets to your objectives

To start with, we wanted to test running tweets that gave the user reasons to engage with the brand including hashtags, usernames, images and external links within the promoted tweets. From this we quickly saw a very high engagement rate of over 15% – great! However, this meant users were clicking through on the hashtags and usernames included in the tweets rather than the brand’s content.

We then started tailoring our tweets to drive traffic to our client’s website instead, in one instance promoting a social competition. Our tweets included links to drive traffic to the site, the competition hashtag and some images that we tested. As a result we have seen a drop in engagement rate but an increase in competition entries, traffic to the website and sales!

Twitter Advertising for Bastyan

2. Keep your tweets fresh

Keeping the content of the promotions fresh and testing different variations is vital to maintaining a strong performance. As Twitter rotate the ads in line with the top performers, it is important to run 5 – 7 tweets per campaign. From our experience, we see tweets tend to go stale after 2/3 days of being live with engagement rates starting to drop. With this in mind, we highly recommend changing the content regularly and planning ahead.

3. Maximise free engagement (whilst it lasts!)

Promoted accounts are used to increase the number of followers using a ‘cost per new follower’ pricing model. When creating this ad type, be sure to include links and hashtags, etc within the tweet to increase brand engagement. As an advertiser, you are only charged per new follower with this ad type, resulting in free engagement with your brand activity.

4. Audience Targeting

As this is a relatively new advertising channel, we have tested several different settings available, including:

  • By keywords
  • By interests
  • By username

Using our experience and knowledge of running paid ads through Google, Bing, Facebook and LinkedIn, we looked to create a granular campaign structure by both by an audience and targeting method. At first we created separate campaigns for each of the above targeting settings – testing different audience targeting through them. We found that username targeting performed best for our clients and interest targeting perform worst.

We recommend using the followers’ data in Analytics, provided in the Twitter Ads interface, when creating targeting settings. You can create campaigns using this information and we highly recommend searching the keyword/username before including in a campaign to understand their relevance.

Twitter Advertising for Bastyan

5. Our results so far:

  • 34% increase in new followers
  • 1.40% conversion rate from traffic to the site (sales and sign ups)
  • 5,160 free tweet engagements through promoted accounts
  • Engagement rate of 8.78%

In summary, we feel the most important aspects of successfully advertising through Twitter are to keep your content fresh, optimise campaigns and to test activity. Keep your content fresh by changing your tweets regularly throughout the week and continually optimise bids and audience settings, by changing bids in response to performance. Finally, always test different targeting settings and tweets to better understand what works for your brand.

 

The Weekly Shop (19th – 23rd May)

It’s Friday so that means a new edition of our Weekly Shop! This week, we look at insights from Social Media London, ugly websites, Google’s release of the Panda 4.0 algorithm and insights from Econsultancy’s new Search Engine Marketing Benchmark Report.

Real-time Twitter marketing & personalisation – top takeaways from #smlondon

This week, Alice Reeves, our senior social media and content consultant attended Social Media London’s May event, which was focused on how brands can make the most of ‘real-time’ Twitter marketing and personalise their social channels to boost engagement. You can read her key takeaways from the conference here.

What if Your Ugly Website is Holding Back Your Marketing Efforts? – Whiteboard Friday

Last week, in Moz’s weekly Whiteboard Friday series they discussed the subject of ugly websites and whether they can actually hold you back from the kinds of levels of engagement and progress that you could be making.

Google Begins Rolling Out Panda 4.0 Now

This week Google’s Matt Cutts announced on Twitter that they have released version 4.0 of the Google Panda algorithm which is designed to prevent sites with poor quality content from working their way into Google’s top search results. It sounds like this update will be a gentler Panda Algorithm and lay the groundwork for future changes in that direction.

Five key insights from our Search Engine Marketing Benchmark Report

This next article from Econsultancy highlights five of the key insights from their Search Engine Marketing Benchmark Report which contains a comprehensive analysis of the UK search marketing environment. The report, covering search engine optimisation (SEO or natural search), paid search (PPC), social media marketing and display advertising, is based on an online survey of more than 700 client-side digital marketers and agencies and reveals some interesting insights.

Thanks for reading. See you next week!

A round-up of Brighton SEO

At the end of last month I attended the best Brighton SEO yet. From the opening keynote to the afternoon’s content-focused talks in the Corn Exchange, the day was packed with actionable takeaways. However, the five talks that really stood out for me were:

  • How I Earned Loads of Links by Ignoring SEO – Malcolm Coles
  • The Habits That Land You Links – Stacey Cavanagh
  • How journalistic principles will shape the digital marketing of tomorrow – Julia Ogden
  • Using Content for Direct Response – Matt Evans
  • The Content Marketing Blueprint for Boring Industries – Mike Essex

Below, you’ll find my summaries (largely taken from my frantically scrawled notes) of the key points from each talk plus links to slide decks where available.

How I Earned Loads of Links by Ignoring SEO – Malcolm Coles

The conference kicked off with a keynote from Malcolm Coles, General Manager at The Daily Mirror and founder of UsVsTh3m. Malcolm spoke about how UsVsTh3m’s goal has always been to gain the biggest share of their traffic through social rather than search. They’ve achieved this through creating topical, highly shareable content in the form of games and quizzes, such as:

  • The ‘Where’s Damascus?’ Game – thousands of people played the game online and failed miserably, including people from the Houses of Parliament, which resulted in news coverage.
  • How Much Are You Hated By The Daily Mail? – though impossible to get to the end of unless you’re Michael Gove, this short piece of interactive content attracted over a million players, multiple pieces of online coverage with hugely authoritative links and caused UsVsTh3m to rank 3rd for the search term ‘Daily Mail’ for months.

Malcolm also spoke about how The Daily Mirror now sees more mobile traffic than desktop. Therefore, you must ensure that any content you outreach to publications (e.g. infographics) needs to look good on mobile. Your outreach email will probably be read in mobile too. What’s more, infographics sent as huge JPEGs won’t look good on mobile – these should be created in HTML and should be responsive. When UsVsTh3m launched their ‘Northometer’ quiz, 85% of plays came from mobile. In fact, the entire UsVsTh3m site is designed for mobile – Malcolm even went as far as to say that they “don’t really care” how it looks on desktop.

The most important takeaway of Malcolm’s talk was about content headlines. The best-performing headlines are interesting (you want to read them) and mysterious (they don’t give too much away) – these are the headlines that get you clicks AND shares.

Essentially, online content can be divided down into four categories: 

  • Gets clicked AND shared (what goes viral)
  • Gets clicked NOT shared (tends to be content that includes swearing – after all, “your Mum is on Facebook”)
  • Gets shared NOT clicked (rubbish headlines, but good content)
  • Doesn’t get shared OR clicked (most online content) 

You want your content to fall into the top category and sites like Buzzfeed work extremely hard to get this right – it’s standard for them to A/B test up to 25 different headlines for each piece of content.

Three more key points from Malcolm’s talk were:

  • If you’re creating content that’s getting shared, the most important thing is that it’s visual – this means people writing about it are forced to link to it because it’s not something that they can describe with the same level of impact
  • The reason quizzes work so well when it comes to generating content that gets shared is because people want to share content that’s self-affirming – i.e. it reinforces the way that people perceive themselves and/or want to be perceived by others
  • Use Facebook Ads to deliver niche content to the right people – when people in a niche start talking about something, it’s likely to get picked up by relevant publications

The Habits That Land You Links – Stacey Cavanagh

Next up was Stacey Cavanagh, Head of Search at Tecmark, talking about getting into the habits that land you links. Stacey spoke about the importance of allowing time to be creative, championing the 6-3-5 method which enables six people to generate 108 ideas in 30 minutes. Next, you should use NUF testing (New, Useful, Feasible) to work out which ideas are worth following up – score each idea out of ten for each of these things and prioritise the highest scoring ideas.

Additional takeaways from Stacey’s talk were:

  • Use a tool such as fivesecondtest.com to A/B test the effectiveness of your tweets
  • Don’t underestimate the importance of having a Flickr page with high quality, original images – ensure all images have a Creative Commons attribution license and include direction as to how to attribute
  • Have regular image reclamation sessions – imageraider.com helps to find sites using your images, then you can request attribution and a link
  • Create stories from surveys – this is a great tactic for getting news links, even if you just write a story about it (you don’t need a fancy infographic to get quality links)
  • Don’t underestimate the effectiveness of offline content – e.g. doing something “real” that results in coverage; links are a by-product of coverage
  • Old-fashioned communications are disruptive – when it comes to outreaching to your contacts, doing something like sending a hand-written letter will get you more attention than an email

How journalistic principles will shape the digital marketing of tomorrow Julia Ogden 

Julia was a journalist before she went on to work at Zazzle. Her talk was about how she’s used the skills she learnt while working in local media to inform her digital marketing tactics. Key points were:

  • Most people don’t read more than 250 words of a piece of content so make sure all the important information is at the top – the introduction to any piece of content needs to hook the reader and make them want to read on
  • The internet is crying out for high quality, well-written content – in essence, this is all that “SEO content” is
  • Content marketers should take advantage of the citizen journalism approach and crowd-source content from brand advocates and social influencers
  • Google rewards a website/business which has a range of followed links, no follow links and even just online mentions – Google recently released a patent to reward content that just mentions a brand or associated keywords, but has no links
  • When you’re creating content, always think about what’s new or different – why should people care about what you have to say?

 Using Content for Direct Response Matt Evans

It was Matt’s first time speaking at Brighton SEO and I thought his talk was one of the most useful from the day. Matt spoke at length about selling through content and provided some really great takeaways.

In essence, we’ve stopped stuffing Google with keywords and started stuffing it with content – but what so many online marketers overlook is that the sales funnel is content.

Matt outlined that there are four stages of the sales funnel that your consumers go through:

  • Unaware – content at this stage should catch peoples’ attention
  • Know the situation – content at this stage should inform people of the situation
  • Product awareness – content at this stage should inform people about the product
  • Purchase intent – content at this stage should push people to sale

Too often, content created “for SEO” overlooks this and completely misses the sales process:

  • Your content should inform your audience – because an informed audience is more likely to purchase
  • Get your content in the right place at the right time – tailor your content to what your audience want / need to see at each stage of the buying journey 
  • Re-market to your content, not just your products – use your content to move your potential customers down the funnel until they’re ready to purchase
  • Don’t underestimate the importance of post-purchase campaigns – it costs 5 x more to acquire a new customer than to sell again to an existing customer
  • Stop thinking about links first – create content with a real purpose

The Content Marketing Blueprint for Boring Industries – Mike Essex

Mike Essex from Koozai spoke about how we’re so obsessed with “great content” that we often totally overlook that fact that “boring content” is actually the best opportunity in content marketing. Great content might achieve awareness, but boring content is what sells.

Opportunities to create boring content include:

  • Your ‘About’ section
  • Technical specifications
  • Press releases (these are still important and great for targeting niche audiences, which can be critically important)
  • Company location pages

Ways that you can achieve stand-out “boring content” are:

  • Repackage boring content in a visually interesting way  – e.g. highly visual technical specification pages
  • Distil your product information down into simple-to-follow comparisons – sometimes you have to focus on what stops people buying and create content to address this
  • Think about customer aftercare – for example, other sites were ranking for Vax user guides so Vax invested in creating their own
  • Have great product pages – Aviva are a great example of a company which uses its product pages to give them a competitive edge

Above all, remember that on-site content such as this MUST convert – that should always be your end goal!

 

 

 

The Weekly Shop (5th – 9th May)

Hello and welcome to Leapfrogg’s Weekly Shop. In this edition, we talk about Twitter and Amazon’s new partnership, how to build and measure gains in customer loyalty, PPC misconceptions and 7 SEO truths that you really can’t ignore.

How Amazon is using Twitter to sell through social media

This week, Amazon and Twitter unveiled a new partnership that allows customers to buy from the retailer via the use of the #AmazonBasket hashtag on Twitter. It certainly marks an interesting step forward in social commerce but is it anything more than a gimmick? Econsultancy explores its usefulness here.

How Waitrose is using omnichannel in a strategy aimed at setting itself apart

Waitrose is a great example of a retailer using omnichannel to set itself apart. Internet Retailing visited Waitrose’s just-opened Swindon branch to see how the supermarket is bringing digital and the store together to create new ways of shopping.

Customer Loyalty Restarts with Every Experience

Allegiance to your brand begins again with every experience, from word-of-mouth mentions to social status updates that are passed around and shared. This next article explores the actionable steps that you can take to systematically build and measure gains in loyalty.

10 Reasons to Hire a PPC Management Expert

PPC advertising has the potential to deliver targeted traffic, but it takes technical know-how to do it properly. This article from Search Engine Watch explores reasons why it will cost you less to hire an expert than it will to launch a campaign on your own.

4 Social PPC Misconceptions

While we’re on the topic of PPC, Social PPC has been around for several years, and is becoming mainstream in the PPC world. Because social PPC is still relatively new, there are many mistaken beliefs about it which this article from Search Engine Land aims to clear up.

7 SEO Truths Every Business Leader Must Understand

Lastly, here’s a useful article from Search Engine Land, which provides seven SEO truths every business leader in 2014 and beyond must understand.

Thanks for reading!

What does the future hold for the Google+ platform?

Last week it was announced that Vic Gundotra – “The Father of Google+” – was leaving the company after eight years. Justifiably, this has sparked plenty of speculation about the future of the social platform, with TechCrunch going so far as to describe Google+ as “the walking dead.”

Since its launch, brands and business have been weaving Google+ not just into their social campaigns but wider natural search strategy. Here’s our round-up of some of the past week’s discussions around developments at Google+ along with our thoughts about what the future may hold for the platform.

Division and evolution

TechCrunch posit their article entitled Google+ is Walking Dead that: “Google+ will no longer be considered a product, but a platform – essentially ending its competition with other social networks like Facebook and Twitter.”

This makes complete sense, seeing as Google+ has failed to generate anywhere near the number of daily active users (within the social stream specifically) that Facebook achieves.

TechCrunch also highlights Google’s statement, which has been quoted in all the additional discussions we’ve read, that Gundotra’s departure “has no impact on our Google+ strategy – we have an incredibly talented team that will continue to build great user experiences across Google+, Hangouts and Photos.”

While there may be no impending changes planned, this comment could be an indicator that these three things end up being separated out into three different products, with Google+ evolving into something else entirely.

Advertising gold dust

In his article, The Impending Demise of Google+ for State of Digital, Barry Adams writes that we should “prepare for a dramatic shift in how Google+ is positioned, and how we as digital marketers are currently using the platform.”

Adams’ view is that the platform is unlikely to disappear altogether as Google has invested too much in acquisition of “advertising gold dust” surrounding users’ connections (via Circles) online activity and device usage. However, he agrees that it has “truly and irrevocably failed” as a social network.

Personalised search

Over at Marketing Land, Danny Sullivan is likewise sceptical that Google will make the decision to kill off Google+ completely. In What Would Happen if Google Really Did Kill Google+?  Sullivan compares Google’s attempt to rival Facebook to Bing’s attempt to challenge Google’s supremacy in search.

His view is that even if Google+ ceases to exist in its current incarnation, Google Accounts would still be a product “perhaps with a profile page, perhaps offering all the integration with Google services as there is now. It just wouldn’t be called Google+.”

Sullivan also points out that Google+ data is largely what’s been used by Google to deliver personalised search results. Without Google+ personalisation will be harder, but – on the flip side – could mean that Google starts to take into account social signals from other accounts such as Facebook and Twitter.

The social stream

Last but not least, in a Recode article headlined Minus its Leader, What’s Left at Google+? Liz Gannes and Mike Isaac suggest that the future of Google+ could see the platform divided up several distinct parts:

• Social stream
• Photos
• Messaging / hangouts
• Identity (Google sign-in)

They observe that “the Facebook-like social stream seems to have the least support, with multiple current Google employees expressing scepticism that it is worth keeping around.” Despite serving 300 million active monthly users (according to Oct 2013 figures), this is still a long way from Facebook’s user base of over a billion monthly active users.

Our thoughts on Google+

In summary, nobody knows what Google are planning for Google+. We’ll be continuing to use the platform as a social network both as an agency and on behalf of our clients, but at the same time preparing ourselves for the fact there’s likely to be a re-positioning in the way the platform sells itself to brands and users.
Despite Google’s assurance that nothing is changing (for now) we’d certainly be thinking about moving your focus away from direct engagement within the social stream – think the opposite of your Facebook strategy – and focusing on the asset creation and sharing capabilities that Google+ can offer your brand such as photos and hangouts.

Remember also that data such as reviews and page summaries are still being pulled into the SERPs, therefore it’s important to have an active presence, while personalisation is informed by Google login data. It seems that – for the time being anyway – Google+ is here to stay.

Alice Reeves on Google+

The Weekly Shop (28th April – 2nd May)

Welcome to another edition of The Weekly Shop. This week we take a look at how Instagram blows other social networks away for engagement, the future of Google+, luxury brands and their online presences and how social media impacts SEO.

Instagram ‘blows other social networks away’ for engagement, delivering 58 times more interactions than Facebook, says Forrester

According to a new report from Forrester, Instagram is the stand-out social network when it comes to delivering engagement. The study was based on three million user interactions with over 2,500 brands and found that while Facebook and Twitter may dominate in terms of user base, people on the networks are less inclined to like, comment or share posts. More over on The Drum.

What does the future hold for the Google+?

Earlier in the week, the man who created Google+, Vic Gundotra, announced he was leaving Google after eight years. Justifiably, this has sparked plenty of speculation about the future of the social platform. Our senior social media and content consultant, Alice, has rounded-up some of the past week’s discussions around developments at Google+ along with our thoughts on what the future may hold for the platform.

High street set to drive 89% of sales by 2020 as shopping evolves: study

O2’s The Future of Retail report predicts that the role of the high street is set for a sea change as shopping evolves still further into a leisure activity. Analysis has calculated that a high street presence will influence retail sales worth as much as £338.5bn a year by 2020. Without stores, online sales would fall by as much as £52bn.

Where are luxury brands going wrong online?

The next two articles from Econsultancy explore luxury brands and their online presences. In this first post, Graham Charlton, looks at what makes a website luxurious, and where some luxury brands are going wrong with examples from the likes of Chanel, Dolce and Gabbana, Manolo Blahnik and Bang & Olufsen.

Five great ecommerce sites from luxury brands

Following on from the above, this second article takes a look at the elements that give sites a luxury feel using some examples of brands that are doing this well by successfully blending style and user experiences.

7 Legitimate Ways That Social Media Impacts SEO

In search news this week, this article from Clickz looks at how social media and SEO overlap and how social can contribute to the overall success of websites in several ways with seven specific examples.

5 New SEO Mantras to Replace Old, Inefficient Thinking

There’s no doubt that SEO has changed and evolved and definitely for the better. This last article from Search Engine Watch provides five new mantras to replace old and inefficient ways of thinking that have permeated across the search industry.

The Weekly Shop (24th – 28th March)

Hello and welcome to The Weekly Shop. In this edition, we look at how you can create engaging packaging experiences, online videos, Pinterest tools, e-mail segmentation case studies and how mobile is fast becoming the dominate channel in search marketing.

The secret to amazing packaging experiences

For any ecommerce company, a shipped package represents one of the most direct touch points to the customer, but it’s also often under-utilised when re-marketing to customers. This article from Econsultancy explores how ecommerce stores can create engaging in-package experiences that bring customers back onto your website or mobile app using examples from the likes of Apple, Birchbox and Bonobos.

96% of consumers find video useful when buying online

A new study from Animoto, an online video creation site, has shown how online video is increasing in importance and effectiveness when it comes to purchase decisions. Their research found that nearly three quarters of consumers are more likely to purchase a product or service if they can watch a video explaining it beforehand. There’s more on the stats over on Econsultancy.

How retailers can make the most of Pinterest tools

With Pinterest users showing more passion than Facebook users do, as its content is shared more often and has a much longer shelf life, it’s becoming increasingly important to ensure Pinterest has a prominent spot on your list of marketing priorities. If you need some inspiration for your Pinterest strategy, then this article from Econsultancy outlines the ways in which retailers can make most of Pinterest tools.

10 case studies that show the power of email segmentation

E-mail marketing still remains one of the most effective channels for driving traffic and conversions but to really reap the benefits, it’s important to personalise your campaigns based on user demographics and behaviours. To show why this tactic is so important, Econsultancy have rounded up 10 case studies from businesses that have improved their traffic or conversions using segmentation.

Mobile To Drive 50 Percent Of Google Paid Search Clicks By End Of 2015 [Study]

Last week, Marin Software released its 2014 annual mobile search advertising report. By digging deeper into its own data on mobile ad performance for Google, Marin has predicted that mobile devices will account for 50 per cent of all paid search clicks globally by December 2015. Although based on U.S data, this study highlights how mobile is fast becoming the dominate channel in search marketing as shoppers increasingly research products online.

Thanks for reading.